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Adey Nyamathi, PhD, ANP, FAAN

Adey Nyamathi, PhD, ANP, FAAN

You are cordially invited to our Gold Bag Speaker Series: Nurse-Led Asha Support Model to Improve Health of Rural Women Living with AIDS in India

Date: Wednesday, December 4, 2019
Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
Location: 250 Berk Hall

Light lunch will be served.
Please RSVP by Monday, December 2, 2019 to cely.dean@uci.edu.

Click here to RSVP

 


Adey Nyamathi, PhD, ANP, FAAN
Founding Dean and Distinguished Professor, Sue and Bill School Gross School of Nursing

Nurse-Led Asha Support Model to Improve Health of Rural Women Living with AIDS in India:

Background: Women living with HIV (WLH) in rural communities face challenges to obtaining treatment and accurate disease-related information. Nutritional deficits exacerbate disease progression.

Method: A quasi-experimental trial of a Nurse-led, Asha (Accredited Social Health Activist)-supported intervention compared 4 distinct programs [(1) Asha-based standard education (SE) alone; (2) SE + nutrition education (+NE); (3) SE + nutrition supplements (+NS); or (4) SE + nutrition education + nutrition supplements (+NENS)] on key disease and nutrition-related outcomes [CD4 count, body mass index (BMI), serum albumin, and hemoglobin]. Assessments occurred at baseline, and months 6 (immediately after intervention), 12, and 18. Multilevel modeling examined effects of program (group) over time.

Findings: Among 600 WLH enrolled (n = 150 per arm), mean age was 34.3; CD4 count 447.4; and BMI (kg/m2) was 20.1 at baseline. At 18-month follow-up, program 4 (+NENS) experienced greatest improvements in CD4 counts compared with program 1 (+SE) [adjusted difference = 223.8. For BMI, programs 3 (+NS; adjusted difference = 2.33) and 4 (+NENS; adjusted difference) exhibited greater gains compared with program 1 (+SE). Programs 3 and 4 were not significantly different from each other. Hemoglobin and serum albumin also improved over time; program 4 (+NENS) exhibited the greatest gains.

Conclusions: A low-cost Nurse-Led, Asha-supported behavioral and nutritional intervention improved outcomes for WLH. Gains were sustained at 18-month follow-up. Similar approaches may help improve HIV and other infectious disease-related outcomes in vulnerable populations.